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The Dog Pound Here is where our members can share information about dogs needing rescue, or needing permanent homes. NO OFFERS OF DOGS FOR SALE OR WANT ADS TO BUY A DOG. This is for RESCUE only.

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Old 16th December 2010, 02:35 PM
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Great Dane in IL

We are trying to help a client find a new home for their great dane. We are a boarding and training facility located in Tilton, IL. We did an evaluation on the dog today because they were concerned because of aggressive tendencies the dog has. After doing an evaluation on him we have come to the conclusion that the dog is not an "aggressive" dog, but a very fearful dog that lacks socialization and exposure to different situations and people. He has bit two teenage girls on two separate occasions, but there were no witnesses to the situation and we believe he bit because he was caught off guard and scared.

The first situation: Friend of daughter came over, they were heading upstairs and the dog bit her on back.
Second situation: Friend came out of bathroom as dog was walking by, he bit girl in the arm.

The owners are moving next June and cannot take him. They were reluctantly thinking that he would have to be put down, but it is our opinion that this dog can be rehomed to the right situation.


Here is some additional information about him;

Name: Cupid
Sex: Male, Altered
Shots: UTD
Age: 14 months
Color: Mostly white, with fawn patches and some black spots



Anyone want to help??? I wanted to ask here before I sent out to area gd rescues. I did post this also on a gd forum I am on.
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Old 16th December 2010, 02:50 PM
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Sorry...but a dog that bites twice should be put down imo. I have ZERO tolerance policy. Also it concerns me that this dog bit girl #1 in her back as she was heading up the stairs...that is not a fear bite imo...he went after her...she was not even facing him.
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Old 16th December 2010, 03:44 PM
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Originally Posted by specsgirl View Post
Sorry...but a dog that bites twice should be put down imo. I have ZERO tolerance policy. Also it concerns me that this dog bit girl #1 in her back as she was heading up the stairs...that is not a fear bite imo...he went after her...she was not even facing him.

I have to disagree. A aggressive dog will have confidence and bite you anytime. He waited until she was walking away. Like I said, the owners did not witness the bit either time, so it is hard to tell. By the end of the evaluation he was letting me pet him, taking treats and was comfortable. At no time during our evaluation did he growl or show any aggressive signs.

Can this dog go to a family with children? NO
Can this dog go to an experienced handler that knows how to handle a dog like this? Yes

They handled his issues by locking him away and never taking him anywhere. So in other words, they have been making his issues worse. This dog has had no formal training and no socialization. IMO, he needs a chance before he is PTS.

If I had the room, time and money, I would take him. I would think he could have a chance in a home that knows how to handle this type of dog.
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Old 16th December 2010, 03:49 PM
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yeah, for a dog that young there is still a good chance of rehab...IF the right home steps up. Was it a bite/nip or full out attack?

For danes this is a huge fear period and they can get snippy if not socialized and left in a fearful state. Biting while the back is turned to me definitely shows fear and insecurity

Would I be able to take a dog like this, no

but others may have great success with him
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Old 16th December 2010, 03:54 PM
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I guess what worries me was that he bit children on two separate occasions. Is there ever a home that is 100% child free? We were faced with that decision with Rascal. Would he be okay in a home with NO other dogs and NO contact with children? Possibly. What about going for walks outside the home where the dog might encounter children? What if he ever gets away? What if his owners have children over to visit?

We just couldn't take the risk.

Additionally, there's the issue of most homeowners insurance policies refusing to cover a dog with a history of two bites. I do wish you luck in finding this dog a home... but I fear it will be very, very difficult.
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Old 16th December 2010, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by greenmagick View Post
yeah, for a dog that young there is still a good chance of rehab...IF the right home steps up. Was it a bite/nip or full out attack?

For danes this is a huge fear period and they can get snippy if not socialized and left in a fearful state. Biting while the back is turned to me definitely shows fear and insecurity

Would I be able to take a dog like this, no

but others may have great success with him


It was a bite/nip. This lady also grooms dogs and took him into her work to help "socialize" him. He was locked in a crate for people and dogs to walk past. She said he would growl at people if they got close. Like we explained to her, "He is locked in a crate, can't go and hide, what's he going to result to in order for people to go away??" I know they had good intentions, but it wasn't the right way to try to make him better.

She also said that one of her daughters will stare him down. The other daughter does not like dogs and will run away from him. Its just a wierd and messed up place for a dog like this to be.
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Old 16th December 2010, 04:56 PM
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It may be hard to find a rescue organization to take on a dog with a bite history - I know we won't take a dog that has bitten, purely for liability reasons.
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Old 16th December 2010, 06:31 PM
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I'm really on the fence on this one. On one hand I like to give any dog a chance especially one that may never have had a chance in the first place due to mishandling. The other hand says "this dog has nailed kids twice without much if any warning" so what's the risk of him doing it again and really doing severe damage the next time? We all know the reports of a dog "suddenly" biting but it turns it the dog had a history of previous bites, just not as serious.

Definitely a hard decision to face. Not one I'd want to face or a dog I could ever in good conscience take on myself.
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Old 16th December 2010, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by frankykeno View Post
I'm really on the fence on this one. On one hand I like to give any dog a chance especially one that may never have had a chance in the first place due to mishandling. The other hand says "this dog has nailed kids twice without much if any warning" so what's the risk of him doing it again and really doing severe damage the next time? We all know the reports of a dog "suddenly" biting but it turns it the dog had a history of previous bites, just not as serious.

Definitely a hard decision to face. Not one I'd want to face or a dog I could ever in good conscience take on myself.

I agree, it is hard to know where to draw the line. I also believe that many dogs would bite a person if provoked. Heck last weekend Foster growled at my best friends bf b/c he was staring him down which I told him last time it happened to NOT do that!

When I was growing up we had a gsd that was timid of new people. Most people knew this and he did bite an adult one time, nothing severe. Should he have put down b/c of this?? Were we making a terrible choice for having a dog with these characteristics?? It's a fine delicate line...I don't know if there is a "right" answer.
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Old 16th December 2010, 07:10 PM
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I think this situation and this dog have to be looked into very carefully. What exactly do they mean by "girls"...as in young female children or almost adult females...what exactly was going on around the time of both bites...how severe were they....what happened immediately after each bite as far as the owners reactions and the dogs reactions....what is this dog's normal reaction to any stressors (strangers, loud noises, etc.).

I know my Marrok for instance will react very differently to a strange boy of 9 or 10 years old compared to a boy of 15 or 16. To Marrok that teenager he doesn't know is more adult-like, more of a possible problem and someone to be watched until he knows from us that it's okay (then he's a big total sucky goofball).

If there's any chance for this dog - and I'm not sure in my own mind that it's safe really to work with a large dog with not one but two previous bite incidents - then I would think only a highly experienced, very committed person in a child-free home would be at all the way to go here and only someone able to make the hard call to put this dog down with love if it's apparent that he really is unsafe.
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Old 16th December 2010, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post
I guess what worries me was that he bit children on two separate occasions. Is there ever a home that is 100% child free? We were faced with that decision with Rascal. Would he be okay in a home with NO other dogs and NO contact with children? Possibly. What about going for walks outside the home where the dog might encounter children? What if he ever gets away? What if his owners have children over to visit?

We just couldn't take the risk.

I have to agree here, this was the same with Saphira, she started showing aggression towards children and there is no guarantee to a child free home..ever, children are everywhere that people go
And with what Leah said, no rescue would take her with a bite history
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Old 16th December 2010, 07:32 PM
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On the other hand, kudos to these people looking far enough into their future to have time to look for a new home for this dog. Honestly, if they're moving in June, they have time to do a lot of good work with their dog and a trainer and not necessarily have to rehome or have him pts.
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Old 16th December 2010, 09:03 PM
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I dunno...it's the bite in the back that bothers me. I'm all for rescuing fearful and problem dogs, but biting even a teenager (versus a child) as she was walking away worries me. I understand that it's a fear reaction from a dog too stressed to act out when someone is "confronting" them, but that seems to be a dangerous lack of bite inhibition. I'm sure you could improve on that, but I don't think you could ever get rid of it. I would be a little more inclined in the dog's favor if he had been cornered...
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Old 16th December 2010, 09:20 PM
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My feelings are that there are too many happy, well adjusted dogs waiting for homes that dogs with troubled pasts should be humanly euth'ed, it sucks, but thats how i feel, its the same reason I dont totally agree with no-kill shelters and that place on the tv show Dogtown. The fact that our local SPCA begs for paper and office supplies, and bitches that they cant afford a new building, but will think nothing of asking for donations to save a dog that was cleaved in the head with an axe, this year alone they had over $10,000 in extra donations, that I know of, to save dogs that should have been euth'ed!
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Old 16th December 2010, 09:34 PM
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Well, I can't say I agree with that entirely, having five dogs with troubled pasts who are now happy pets, but I do see your point. I'm also not in favor of long term housing (ie: no-kill shelters, etc) for homeless pets as I agree that that gives no quality of life and often creates problems where there were none previously. But I also kind of think that as long as we are the cause of the problem creating these overpopulations of dogs with troubled pasts, then we have a responsibility to them. I don't go out of my way to take on a problem dog, but if I end up with one then I take responsibility for rehabilitating it. I'm not going to euthanize it when I think there is hope for it. I'm just not sure there is a whole lot of hope for re-homing this Dane. Now, if the present owners decide to commit 100% to helping him, and to managing those issues that they may never correct, and are still able to offer him quality of life, then more power to them. However, that is a HUGE, potentially life-changing decision, and I can understand them not wanting to take it on if that is what they decide.

I can certainly relate. I don't think I could ever re-home Laika or Ze'eva successfully. However, they will never be re-homed, so that's fine. If it came down to it (which, barring extrodinary circumstances, will never happen), I would have to consider some very difficult decisions for them.

Of anyone here, I think Di understands best what this family is probably dealing with.
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