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Deciding on a Breeder?

Discussion in 'Dog Breed Info' started by aDorkable, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. aDorkable

    aDorkable 1 Tail, 1 Nub
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    What things do you ask/look for in your breeder and what would make you walk (or run) away?

    I know to look for health clearances and look at what the breeder is doing compared to what I want to do. But, for example, I contacted a breeder that I know two dogs out of. These two dogs are confident, nice in size and temperament, happy, easy to train, etc. Then he told me that he spends 24/7 with the puppies (barring small breaks given to him by his wife) and that the puppies don't set foot outside until after their first vaccination at 7 weeks. This seems like they are missing some critical socialization by spending the first 8 weeks of life primarily in a home office. But I also acknowledge that this will be my first time going with a breeder, and I'm still a bit from making any decisions or moving forward. I will be trying to get out to more local shows and talking to owners of dogs I like to learn more.
     
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  3. ShiLowe's Lions

    ShiLowe's Lions Veteran Porchie
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    I have walked away from a few conversations that had me feeling that they were not interested in me. Lowe's breeder was recommended to me, Morgan's breeders are teachers and were producing long lived dogs. Dakota's breeder I knew from school, but she approached me about Dakota.

    If things seem hinky run, even if you think they seem off in their answers to you. I had a few that were displeased I think with my interview questions. I know they have their questions, but I always have mine too. Answers have to go both ways.

    Everyone but Dakota have had repo clauses in them. If your not willing to possibly have a breeder drop by, I would walk away. I was fine with it. Some breeders also have strict health testing and registration clauses.
     
  4. Amaziah

    Amaziah Veteran Porchie
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    The in the house til 7-8 weeks depends on the breed & my comfort level. It's not abnormal for breeders of small breeds to do this.
    Sydney, her littermates, & her parents were all put into outdoor kennels, full-time, by 5-6 weeks old. My litters are usually out 6-8 hours a day by this time, depending on weather. They sleep indoors, because the coyotes are way too bad around here. It's good for them & Saint puppies are big.
     
  5. aDorkable

    aDorkable 1 Tail, 1 Nub
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    These are Labradors, and it didn't sound like the breeder was doing much by way of enrichment in the house, although I could be completely wrong about that. The two dogs I know are very nice in temperament.
     
  6. NamasteDogs

    NamasteDogs BDP Staff
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    Does this breeder maybe do early neuro stimulation?

    I dunno, I spoke to two RR breeders here, one was unusually low priced (as in I could get 2-3 puppies from that breeder for the price of one from the other) and when I asked about health testing, he dodged the question and asked if I was ready to send a deposit. Um...sure, just not to you because I got a hinky vibe. Then I investigate a little further and realise that every.single.litter. he has bred for the last 4 years have ALL been sired by the same stud dog. Every single one. We're talking 4-6 litters a year. Sorry but no dog is THAT good.

    Other breeder was happy to chat clearances with me, discuss what I was looking for in a puppy and whether or not the breed was even right for me, as I had my doubts. After several lengthy conversations with her - a deposit has been sent, and now we wait.
     
  7. aDorkable

    aDorkable 1 Tail, 1 Nub
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    I didn't really get a super straight answer when I asked about what experiences the puppies had up to 8 weeks. He said they see his retired females, who live in the house (all others are kenneled), his children ages 10 and 13, and they play classical music for them. Which didn't really touch on if they meet other people, new surfaces, typical "scary" objects (umbrellas, hats, etc). Plus this breeder doesn't really want me to have an 8-week old puppy in a daycare environment, because he thinks it's too high risk (even if said puppy was up front, not in groups), but offers something where he would keep the puppy until it was 12 weeks old and do some training (for an additional fee).

    I'm hoping to get out to some shows and maybe meet more of his dogs (and others) to see how I feel. He also showed zero interest in the fact that I wanted to compete with this dog as well. He only does conformation showing and claims to do "obedience" but it doesn't extend past the CGC or TDI test.
     
  8. Amaziah

    Amaziah Veteran Porchie
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    For what it's worth, I'm not all that comfortable with an 8 week old in a high traffic environment, like a daycare. I also keep my puppies until 10 weeks, though.
     
  9. SaintWinslow

    SaintWinslow Veteran Porchie

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    I think interacting with more of his dogs to see if they fit what you are looking for is a great idea if possible. It's crazy how much variation there is in labs. If you keep meeting them and liking them, maybe it is for you, if not, maybe trying to find someone whose dogs compete in similar venues?

    As far as in a daycare at 8 weeks, I know some of my co-workers will bring them that early but keep them in a kennel further from the action, which sounds like your plan. I'd probably be more comfortable at 10 then 8 but none of mine were that young so it's hard to say. Rally was 9 ish weeks, and my original intention was for her to come to work with me, but compared to the shelter she was from it was quieter and lower risk. As it turns out, she had to stay home because of her upper respiratory infection anyway, and I think it was better for her the first couple of weeks. I'm not really surprised as isolated as he keeps them that that throws him off, that's a big change.

    I will say we see some nutty labs, so if you really like the dogs he's producing, might be worth it.
     
  10. aDorkable

    aDorkable 1 Tail, 1 Nub
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    I would really much prefer a pup to stay with its litter/breeder until 10 or 12 weeks, but if all the other puppies are gone, and I wasn't 110% on the socialization, then I'd rather get a puppy at 8 weeks.

    The area at work is pretty much closed off to non employee dogs and bleach mopped 4 times a week minimum. But, that's only if I still have *this* job and I get a puppy.
     
  11. aDorkable

    aDorkable 1 Tail, 1 Nub
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  12. Dignity

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    Nessie was with her breeder until she was 12 weeks old - people started picking up at around the 10 week mark; at the 10 week mark her breeder had all the puppies checked by a cardio vet because Newfies are known to have heart issues. What was totally amazing to me - Nessie was 95% potty trained when she came home to me!
     
  13. oddmanout

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    Paddy was 10.5 weeks when he came to us. He was raised "in home" with kids. The pups had outdoor playtime from the time the pups were walking around.

    The "other" Lab puppy I had (that I don't speak of) was also family-raised (different breeder, same lineage as Paddy). He, too, had ample outdoor playtime that included time with the other adults the breeder had. That pup was 12 weeks old when he arrived -- already 90% potty trained, knowing the name I'd chosen for him; with "sit" "lay" and "come" already firmly in place.

    I guess my point is, if the breeder is *hands-on* and very involved with the youngsters, it's very helpful in those early days/weeks when they come to you.

    (Mia, on the other hand, after being weaned from bottle feeding, was apparently pretty much ignored by her rescue "foster" since at 14 weeks she had no trained potty abilities, was afraid of EVERYTHING and was even wary of Paddy for the first week or two. She also was food *aggressive* -- as aggressive as a 14-week-old can be -- and had an obvious lack of exposure to different types of surfaces. But then, with the hindsight that the rescue was a scam/sham/for-shit bunch of losers, I'm not surprised Mia was so retarded in her growth and development)
     
  14. oddmanout

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    Also, if you're serious about a Labrador, read up on EIC (exercise induced collapse) which is a genetic disorder. The breeder of the pup (I never speak of) tested his breeding stock when this issue came to the light and subsequently speutered those that were carriers. His dogs were Field Labs and he felt he couldn't ethically produce pups who may (and have) died doing what they were "bred to do"
     
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  15. SaintWinslow

    SaintWinslow Veteran Porchie

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    Yeah, I totally get that. If they aren't getting socialized or exposed to new things, longer isn't necessarily better.
     
  16. NamasteDogs

    NamasteDogs BDP Staff
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    Journey came home at 12 weeks, but was ready for pickup from his breeder at 9 weeks. All the other pups save for the 3 they kept were gone when we got him. I wonder sometimes if it would have made a difference had I gotten him more than a week before he hit a fear period, but I don't know how much of that was genetic, and how much was timing.

    NextPuppy should be picked up around 9 weeks I think.
     
  17. bmdmom

    bmdmom Power Porchie

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    I definitely prefer older puppies. Give me a 3-4 month old puppy over an 8 week old any day!
     
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  18. jimandthom

    jimandthom Veteran Porchie
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    Ripley was 16 weeks at the time we got him as they were waiting for the DNA tests to comeback being a dual breeding. So we missed some of the really early fluffy buttisms which would have been nice to have experienced.
     
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